“Phantom of the Opera” 2004 v.s. 25th Anniversary

“The Phantom of the Opera” is a story about love, seduction and mystery. Over the years there have been countless film versions, including the 2004 movie based off the 1986 musical adaption. For the 25th anniversary of the stage show, the London performance was filmed at the Royal Albert Hall and released on DVD months later.

The movie is now considered below par among most “Phans” who love the stage show. Gerard Butler, Emmy Rossum and Patrick Wilson starred in it and Joel Schumacher directed it.

Watching the film now, I have noticed a few things I did not a few years ago. The leads are not as impressive as I thought previously, and a few things do not make sense, one of them is the “Point of No Return” scene. It looks as if Christine is plotting her own plan, rather than being scared like in the stage show.

After years of the 2004 movie being the only source to view the musical when it was not on tour, it was a surprise when the “Phantom” team announced the 25th anniversary of the stage show would be recorded and released on DVD in 2011 for the U.K. and 2012 for the U.S.

The 25th anniversary starred Ramin Karimloo, Sierra Boggess and Hadley Fraser as the lead roles. Karimloo and Boggess had been in different productions of “Phantom” and co-stared in the “Phantom” sequel, “Love Never Dies.” Fraser was the only actor of the three who had no experience with the show.

Butler and Karimloo played the Phantom differently, however, Karimloo portrayed the role on West End and had more experience. He made the role his own and has a fantastic voice.

Butler is more of an actor than a singer, which is not good considering the role is vocally demanding and the Phantom is meant to have an angelic voice. Schumacher chose Butler because of his looks, rather than his voice and told him to “make it sexy” during filming.

The Phantom is not meant to be a physically handsome man. The character’s voice and skills as a musician are what make him beautiful. His desire for love and to have an undeformed face are what make him human and depending on who portrays the Phantom, he can be a bit childlike. While these are traits that make the audience love him, he is meant to be insane, angry and murderous, which is why people in the show fear him.

Boggess and Rossum are very different in their portrayals of Christine. Like Karimloo, Boggess had previously played her role and is considered a fan favorite. She has an incredible soprano voice and put a lot of emotion into the character.

Rossum was 16 years old at the time of filming for the 2004 movie and while she is a good actress, there was not a lot of emotion in her voice, which is an important aspect of the show. Her version of “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again” is mediocre and I did not hear the sadness or desperation that the song requires when I last watched the film.

Christine is vocally and physically demanding role. The character has the most stage time; she is a ballet dancer and hits the highest note in the musical (E6). Throughout the show the audience can see her character development, as she goes from being shy and innocent to a woman who is not afraid to stand up for herself.

Stage actors, Fraser and Wilson are very different in their portrayals of Raoul. Fraser’s Raoul tended to come off as rude, angry and a bit unemotional. He is not my favorite and it did not help he was playing Javert in the stage version of “Les Misérables” at the time. However, he had the right look and he has a great voice. He would make a fantastic Phantom if he ever decided to portray the role.

Originally, Wilson auditioned for the Phantom, but was given the role of Raoul. He did a great job with the character and had a good voice to match. Unfortunately, his long and distracting wig often overshadows this.

Raoul is the anti-Phantom. He is handsome, young and his love for Christine is pure. He will risk his own life for the woman he loves and is not intimidated by the Phantom. Depending on who plays the role, Raoul is either likable or hated. It all comes down to the actor.

The biggest hit or miss for any “Phantom” film is the deformity. Why is this important?

  • It is a part of the Phantom’s appearance
  • It is part of the reason why the Phantom is bitter and angry at the world
  • It is the reason why the Phantom is insecure
  • It gives Christine a reason to fear him in the first act
  • It is a mystery to the audience until nearly the end of the musical
  • It shows the makeup artist’s talent

A “Phan’s” definition of a good deformity means the Phantom’s face has to look hideous and he must have very little hair. We saw it in the anniversary; unfortunately, we received the exact opposite in the 2004 film. The Phantom had a head full of blonde hair and the deformity looked like a sunburn.

The sets in both films are different. The movie has a more realistic set design, including a few ideas from the novel, which I love. The look for the opera house was very well done, especially for the stage. I liked the underground lair and the Phantom’s organ.

The 25th anniversary included props from the original stage show. Unfortunately, some of them had to be left out, but the cast was able to work around it. Personally, I prefer this set because it gives the audience the magic of the musical.

I grew up with the 2004 version of “Phantom,” but the 25th anniversary is my favorite. It introduced me to actors I did not know of in 2012 and it gave me a higher appreciation for people involved in theater. It is fantastic and is a must have for any fan of the stage show or movie.


If I could recast the “Phantom of the Opera” movie in 2016

Do you ever watch “The Phantom of the Opera” 2004 movie and say, “What were they thinking?”

Do you ever wish they had cast Ramin Karimloo as Raoul instead of Christine’s father, who only had two, three second cameos. Do you wish they had casted a vocally stronger Christine, a younger looking Raoul and a better singer than Gerard Butler? So do I.

If I could recast “The Phantom of the Opera” movie in 2016, this is who I would cast:


John BarrowmanJohn-Barrowman-image-john-barrowman-36440683-600-850

Barrowman played Raoul in “Phantom” on West End (London) in 1992. He has a lot of stage experience, having been in many musicals before he was on television. He has also recorded several albums over the years and has toured after their releases.

Barrowman is famous for being on the television shows “Doctor Who,” “Torchwood” and “Arrow.” He currently plays the villain in the latter, so Phantom would not be a big stretch.

Like Gerard Butler, he is Scottish and very good looking. Unlike Butler, he is a professional theater actor, who is vocally trained and would have more knowledge of what the role requires.



Julia UdineUnknown

Udine is 22-years-old, portrayed Christine on the “Phantom” U.S. tour and is currently playing the same role on Broadway. She has a spectacular voice and is a fan favorite due to her age and career.

I saw her twice on tour and she is one of my favorite actresses who has played the role of Christine. Her acting and vocal range are amazing.

Like Emmy Rossum, Udine is one of the youngest actresses to play the role. Unlike Rossum, Udine is a professional theater actress and knows what is required to play the role. She can sing with emotion and her voice would not be as low during “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again.”



Chris McCarrellIMG_6400

McCarrell is currently portraying Marius in the “Les Misérables” revival (closing in March). He is young, has a great voice and has a smile that melts fangirls’ hearts.

Personally, I think he would be a great fit if he was given the chance to play Raoul, even on Broadway. He would portray the role better than Patrick Wilson, who has a great voice, but wore a terrible wig and looked too old for the part.




Samantha BarksSamantha Barks, Awardsline, December 15, 2012

Barks is one of the biggest names in musical theater. She got her start in on the BBC show “I’d Do Anything,” a show where girls and young boys competed to play Nancy and Oliver for the musical, “Oliver.” She was the youngest competitor and came in third.

Since “I’d Do Anything,” Barks was in “Les Misérables” on West End, the 25th anniversary concert and 2012 movie version as Eponine. She played the role of Nancy in the “Oliver” U.K. tour in 2011 before leaving to film “Les Mis” and returning a year later. She has been in several movies and musicals since then.

Barks is a Mezzo-Soprano and she can dance, so I think she could portray Meg and do the role justice. I am a huge fan of hers and I know this is a role she would knock out of the park.


Madame Giry

Idina Menzel


Is there anything this woman cannot do? Musicals, movies, television shows, albums and a large fan base from around the world. This woman can do it all.

Menzel started her Broadway career as Maureen in the musical, “Rent,” a role she reprised 10 years later for the movie version. Since then she has been in “Wicked,” a role which she won a Tony for, but her overall career seemed to take off once she played Elsa in Disney’s, “Frozen.”

While she has never played a role like Madame Giry, that I know of, she would nail it. Plus, I would love to see her and Barks playing mother and daughter.



Kristin ChenowethUnknown-1

Another woman who can do anything and she can do it in style. She is also from my home state, Oklahoma, so I am a bit biased.

Chenoweth is another fan favorite. She is funny, can hold some very high notes and can play any role she is given. She won a Tony for her role as Sally in “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown,” has been in several other musicals, movies, television shows and hosted the Tony Awards in 2015 with Alan Cumming.

Chenoweth is well known for originating the role of the popular girl, G(a)linda in the musical, “Wicked,” so I do not think Carlotta is much of a stretch. Chenoweth is a very talented actress and has a fantastic voice, I would love to see her as Carlotta.


Andre and Firmin (The Managers)

Ramin Karimloo and Hadley Fraser


Hadley Fraser (left) and Ramin Karimloo (right)

Over the past few years these two have been known to portray enemies while in a musical together. In the “Phantom” 25th anniversary in 2011, Karimloo played Phantom and Fraser played Raoul. On West End’s “Les Misérables” in 2012, Karimloo played Jean Valjean and Fraser played Javert. In reality, they are best friends and have their own band.

I can very easily see Karimloo and Fraser as the managers.  I think they would have fun with it and make the audience laugh. The roles are not as vocally challenging as the Phantom and Raoul are, but it would give Fraser and Karimloo a chance to act like goofballs.


The Auctioneer

Michael Crawfordarticle-1362592-0D7561ED000005DC-603_468x665

The original Phantom and inspiration to many, who was robbed of his chance to be in the 2004 “Phantom” movie, Michael Crawford. That is all.